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The Tea Crane Blog — Japanese tea

Why is it more difficult to find high-grade organic matcha as opposed to organic leaf tea?

Posted by Tyas Sōsen on

Why is it that most 'organic' matcha teas turn out to be bitter and unsuitable for thick tea? Should we simply accept the answer that is most often heard among members of the tea industry? "It is just impossible to match the quality of a non-organically grown matcha, using only organic methods." I don't think so. This response is merely a show of ignorance and laziness. 

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I Tasted 187 Teas In One Day.

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

From 9am in the morning until 4pm in the afternoon I tasted 98 different kinds of sencha, 14 types of Gyokuro, and 75 variations of oxidized and fermented teas. In total, I tasted 187 teas in about 7 hours, more than I have ever tasted, and more than I ever believed I was capable of doing in the span of just one day.

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A lesson on Bancha at a Prime Minister's villa

Posted by Stephen Sōshun on

Most commonly Bancha is considered as tea that is drunk on a daily basis, and is thus therefore supposed to be ‘inexpensive.

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Three Faces of Nature

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

In just two hours, we had tasted 5 teas, and watched 3 different gardens. I couldn’t have thought of a more unique tea tasting myself. The taste of the teas we savored may never be the same again; and the occasion, shared with all attendees, will never return. This afternoon has turned into a treasure to be kept in our hearts forever.

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Visiting The Shapers Of The Japanese Tea Of The Future.

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

I believe that tea is not suited for mass production. On the contrary, it must be savored and treasured with great care and compassion, as it is the life and energy of the bush that we are allowed to receive.

 

 

 

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Identifying The Crux To True Tea-Farming

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

Having managed to reject false agricultural “common sense”, and having instead learned indeed to trust even robust branches to decompose of their own accord, and into a source of sustenance for whatever grows nearby, these devoted cultivators have by now identified the crux to true tea-farming.  

 

 

 

 

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Tea Doesn't Need Us To Help It Grow.

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

Eschewing use of artificial fertilizers and pesticides means that the work required by spraying bushes and tampering with soil-composition is eliminated, thereby not only reducing labor but also avoiding the expense of purchasing unnatural additives for the tea-bush. And it happens that this approach at the same time results in an unaltered product notable for purity of flavor, and endowed with the traits and strength of nature itself.

 

 

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The Maliciousness Of Agricultural Chemicals.

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

Today, Tokuya continues his efforts to produce a truly healthy and poison-free tea, and has begun to apply the same method on other agricultural products. His experience, and what this taught him is valuable information, which he thrives to share with others in order to raise awareness about the existence of the issues he suffered. His hopes are that this may aid more people to recognize the source of certain discomforts, and in the long run that no one more needs to endure similar hardship.

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The Efficiency of Machines vs. Our Preference of Taste

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

I am in favor of re-discovering the true tradition of Japanese tea through fragrance and scent. Do you choose the illusion of health, or are you in favor of sharing in the joy of a truly delicious tea? It is my feeling that the true future of Japanese green tea lies in the possibilities of withering.

 

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How Machinery Changed the Landscape of Tea Farming

Posted by Sōsen Tyas on

Where harvesting by hand didn’t require a dedicated shape of bush, machinery however demanded an equal surface in order to smoothly glide over the trees, and gather leaves in a single stretch. Drawn by the promise of a 60 times higher produce, the implementation of machinery prospered, and with it the layout of traditional tea gardens changed forever.

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